Just give me a simple HELLO WORLD example for ipywidgets

I developed my jupiter notebook, I’m very stressed with workload, and thus I don’t have time for learning all the cumbersome documentation for ipywidgets

Please, just give me a simple one-file hello world example on how to use ipywidgets with a simple input box, sharable with voila link. Google doesn’t help at all, just forward me to documentation.

Thanks

Looks like progress over here at unlinked, similar post

(Please link cross-posts, or very,very similar/related posts, so that people helping you don’t waste time saying something someone already said, you can find your own answers, and others following in your footsteps can find it without hitting what they unknowlingly believe is deadend.)

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import ipywidgets as widgets
from IPython.display import display


text_input = widgets.Text(
    value='',  # Initial 
    description='Type here:',  # Label for the text input
    disabled=False  #  to be editable
)

# Function to handle changes in the text input
def on_text_change(change):
    if change['type'] == 'change' and change['name'] == 'value':
        print(f"You entered: {change['new']}")

# Observe changes in the text input widget
text_input.observe(on_text_change, names='value')

display(text_input)
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The above example suggests the direct use of print() which isn’t handled well by ipywidgets running in current Jupyter flavors.

Proposed options that work in all current Jupyter tech

The use of print() is not easily compatible with ipywidgets use in Jupyter Notebook 7+. With current JupyterLab, the print() will go to the Log console, see here for more about that.
Therefore, to have something that works in the output area of any flavor current Jupyter tech, limiting lines and complexity, I’d propose you change that to add handling of changes with a ‘status’ output that can be updated because a DisplayHandle has an update() method:

import ipywidgets as widgets
from IPython.display import display, HTML


text_input = widgets.Text(
    value='',  # Initial 
    description='Type here:',  # Label for the text input
    disabled=False  #  to be editable
)

# Function to handle changes in the text input
def on_text_change(change):
    if change['type'] == 'change' and change['name'] == 'value':
        status_output.update(HTML(f"You entered: {change['new']}"))

status_output = display(HTML("STATUS WILL UPDATE HERE"), display_id=True)

# Observe changes in the text input widget
text_input.observe(on_text_change, names='value')

display(text_input)

That above requires the least change from darktrender’s code. The status_output related code and the addition of HTML to the end of the from IPython.display import-line is the only real changes needed from darktrender’s code.

Alternative option that can run in either Jupyter tech currently: remains using print()

If you introduce a context manager to handle print() going to output , like illustrated here and elsewhere in the ipywidget’s documentation, you can still use print() and get it to show in the cell’s output area. Starting with the darktrender’s code, you’d end up with something like the following that can run in either Jupyter tech:

import ipywidgets as widgets
from IPython.display import display
output = widgets.Output()

text_input = widgets.Text(
    value='',  # Initial 
    description='Type here:',  # Label for the text input
    disabled=False  #  to be editable
)

# Function to handle changes in the text input
def on_text_change(change):
    if change['type'] == 'change' and change['name'] == 'value':
        with output:
            output.clear_output() # from 'Output widgets: leveraging Jupyter’s display system' https://ipywidgets.readthedocs.io/en/latest/examples/Output%20Widget.html
            print(f"You entered: {change['new']}")

# Observe changes in the text input widget
text_input.observe(on_text_change, names='value')

display(output, text_input)

While not much more is needed compared to the option above, the addition of the output widget and wrapping the print statements in the with output context results definitely becoming more complex that darktrender’s code.

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