Introduce yourself!

Heya - I’m new to Jupyter, vaguely familiar with python, and I write a lot of code in modern Fortran for applications in large-scale simulations and data analysis and modeling in theoretical physics (nuclear & particle, astrophysics & cosmology). Agh! Did he say “Fortran.” Yep! – it’s not your grandaddy’s language anymore. (Classes, polymorphism, dynamic allocation, etc.) Great to be here.

7 Likes

Hi Sebastian,
I agree with your desire that all publications should include a reproducible notebook.
I am implementing this standard for my physics majors in their junior laboratory course.
Students keep all their data and jupyter notebooks on Open Science Framework, and all
analysis and reports are turned in as a Jupyter Notebook.
-paul
Univ. of Southern Maine

4 Likes

Hello there -
My name is Joe. I’m and electrical engineer who mostly does Python and frontend development now, alongside a Data Science team in a big company.

Python and Jupyter are, of course, very popular here, but since we’re in an enterprise, we have a lot of issues with setting up servers, permissions on various machines, etc.

We’re just now getting into JupyterHub to try to help our department work on DS projects with minimal setup, and I will probably have a lot of questions here about getting that set up!

3 Likes

Hi!
I’m Kati Lassila-Perini, an experimental particle physicist from Helsinki Institute of Physics. I’m based at CERN and I coordinate data preservation and open access of the CMS experiment. I also bring open data and basic data skills to high-school teachers and students in my country with jupyter notebooks through mybinder, and it is so fun and easy with these tools that I just can’t get over it. Thanks folks!

5 Likes

Hi, my name is Eric Durham. I am a structural analyst and designer with focus on temporary structures and the occasional art project. I use JupyterLab for calculations, documentation and development of simple Python scripts. I found Jupyter out of my frustration with other, proprietary products for structural analysis. I love collaborating with others and I am grateful to the community for developing such a useful and universal tool. Cheers!

3 Likes

Hello! My name is Colleen and I work for Research Computing at Portland State University. I am very new to JupyterHub and I’m excited to learn more. I think it could be an incredibly valuable resource to researchers at PSU.

7 Likes

Hi! I’m Matt Henderson, and I have been working on Jupyter related projects at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab as a Computer Systems Engineer. I’ve been working recently with Shreyas Cholia and others on adapting parts of the Jupyter ecosystem for HPC users.

6 Likes

Hello, I’m Alberto, I work at the European Bioinformatic Institute. I give IT support to the internal and external users, and I take care of introducing new technology. I’m currently working on an installation of binderhub,

4 Likes

Hello. I’m Marek. I’m from Czech Republic. I teach on secondary school.
I’m interesting in Linux, Python, electrotechnics.

4 Likes

HI,
I am somewhat new and very old to programming. I started with dBaseIII, Vim and Visual basic in the 80’s, Took 30 years off of programming. Now I am working with Python and SQL. Things are different from my days of a DOS or QNX prompt.
I did some work with Python on Cisco networks last year and found Jupyter Notebooks very useful. Starting to work more now with postgresql and psycopg2. Been a tough road so far getting the tools to work. More fun to come.

5 Likes

Hi all, prompted by @betatim on Twitter I thought I’d better introduce myself. I’m Tim Sherratt, a digital historian who’s been using Jupyter to build up a repository of tools, examples, hacks, and tutorials for people wanting to explore data from GLAM organisations (Galleries, Libraries, Archives, and Museums). Mostly focused on Australia and NZ at present. It’s called the GLAM Workbench and is, of course, constantly under construction…

4 Likes

Hi! Eugene Ciurana here - angel investor, computer engineer, Python / R / Java guy, and open source evangelist. Twitter: @pr3d4t0r - I’ve been working in ML and exploratory data analysis of unstructured data since 2011. Successful tech stacks include Badoo (billing, fraud detection), Summly, Yahoo! Knowledge Graph, Cosmify, Meltwater Fairhair.ai Knowledge Graph. These days I work on predictive analytics for optimizing consumer pricing, genetic algorithms, and learning Dart/Flutter. Cheers!

4 Likes

Hi, I’m Mike. I try to use computer science to help further biomedical research. If multi-omics tells you something - that’s my thing! Currently a DPhil student at Oxford.

Jupyter helped me a lot when I had to work remotely, and now I try to give back to the community by sharing my scripts and experiments which proved to be helpful (and I hope that you will enjoy them too!), including:

  • code intelligence (linter, completions, etc) integration for lab, jupyterlab-lsp,
  • a bunch of helper scripts I used in my master’s project: jupyter-helpers,
  • go-to-definition extension for lab,
  • manim (the library for maths video) integration with IPython using %%manim magic

And two previously unannounced toys:

  • %vault magic, a more powerful version of IPython’s %store: data-vault,
  • nbpipeline, an experiment of crossbreeding snakemake and Jupyter (or, to make reproducible notebooks pipelines with visualisations) - very experimental but feedback welcome.

I put links to the repositories in a GitHub gist.

It was a great pleasure to interact with Jupyter community and contributors - I look forward to continuing working with you all, and maybe meeting you at a conference in the future!

7 Likes

Hello, I am Pierre, from Paris, France.
I am (paleo-)climate modeller interested in the links between tectonics, climate, and biodiversity.
I have stepped in the Jupyter Notebook universe last year.
Since then, I’ve been using notebooks almost daily, with NOAA pyferret embedded to visualize netcdf files, thanks to the ferretmagic plugin. Although I am far from being an expert user, Jupyter Notebooks are so convenient I am encouraging everyone in my group to use them.

An example: colleagues and I have recently submitted a paper which I tried to make “fully-open” :
The model code can be freely downloaded, the outputs can be retrieved on the Zenodo plateform.
Thanks to Chris Holdgraf’s “Zenodo+Binder how to guide”, we also managed to make the analyses available as well, gathered in a single jupyter notebook embedded in Binder. Thus all the figures from the paper can be checked, re-generated, or… improved ! (Any feedbacks most welcome :slight_smile: )
Cheers !

5 Likes

I am wandasiem, a graduate student at UConn in the Business Analytics and Project Management program. I am working on learning python and in the process discovered Jupyter. I am happy to find a site where I can ask questions and hope for help.

thanks,

Wanda

2 Likes

Hi, I’m Vishnu. software engineer by profession. Major part of my work include interaction with JupyterLab and notebooks. I love to contribute to jupyter ecosystem.

2 Likes

Hi there, I’m Fabien from Belgium, enthusiastic python user and teacher. Looking forward to use Jupyterhub for my students :smile:

2 Likes

I’m a mathematician. Just started with Jupyter Notebooks.
I would like to use vim, when editing the notebooks, particularly the markdown cells. Google gives lots of hits, but when I look them up, they assume I know what’s going on, which I don’t. Where can I find ELEMENTARY instructions for how to get vim working? Here possibly? Vim bindings might be sufficient. I have reasonable knowledge of vim, but not expert. I know very little about Jupyter. I am using a J notebook for a Python3 project. I know nothing about browsers and adding extensions to them. Thanks for any help.

1 Like

Perhaps I should have said that I’m using bash on a Macbook Pro